Journal of Online Trust and Safety

The Journal of Online Trust and Safety is a no fee, fast peer review, and open access journal. Authors may submit letters of inquiry to assess whether their manuscript is a good fit. The Journal of Online Trust and Safety is now accepting letters of inquiry for its third issue and special issues.

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Narratives from overt propaganda, unattributed Telegram channels, and inauthentic social media accounts

Research on inauthentic behavior on TikTok, misinformation on Stanford's campus, Telegram activity in Belarus, health insurance scams that run advertisements on Google, and QAnon content on Tumblr.

How well do platform reporting flows and context labels work with screen readers for the visually impaired?

In this post and in the attached reports, we investigate four newly suspended Twitter operations.

The report is the culmination of work by Aspen Digita's Commission on Information Disorder, with guidance from Stanford Cyber's Renee DiResta, Alex Stamos, Daphne Keller, Nate Persily and Herb Lin, and provides a framework for action with 15 recommendations to build trust & reduce harm.

Blogs

This is the fourth of a series of pieces we have published on societies and elections at risk from online disinformation. The politically-fueled disinformation engine in Brazil puts the country in the midst of an information crisis leading up to its 2022 presidential election.

Blogs

This is the fourth of a series of pieces we have published on societies and elections at risk from online disinformation. The politically-fueled disinformation engine in Brazil puts the country in the midst of an information crisis leading up to its 2022 presidential election.

The journal of Online Trust and Safety published its inaugural issue on Thursday, October 28.

Riana Pfefferkorn is a research scholar at the Stanford Internet Observatory and a member of the Global Encryption Coalition. This first appeared in Brookings TECH STREAM.

Alex Stamos talks with Jon Stewart on the vulnerabilities of our democracy and the role of social media.

The playbook will be launched on Monday 20 September at 9:30am ET.

A new piece in Brookings by Riana Pfefferkorn looks at anti-hacking laws

Stanford Internet Observatory launches a new open-access journal to feature cutting-edge research on online harm.

Blogs

An Investigation into a Jordanian Disinformation Campaign on Facebook, TikTok and Twitter

In The Politics of Order in Informal Markets: How the State Shapes Private Governance, Grossman explores findings that challenge the conventional wisdom that private good governance in developing countries thrives when the government keeps its hands off private group affairs.

SIO releases its two year report summarizing its first two years of research, teaching and policy and laying the path for the years to come.

When we’re faced with a video recording of an event—such as an incident of police brutality—we can generally trust that the event happened as shown in the video. But that may soon change, thanks to the advent of so-called “deepfake” videos that use machine learning technology to show a real person saying and doing things they haven’t.
Blogs

The Stanford Internet Observatory’s latest report compares online platforms’ policies on self-harm content.

Researchers from Stanford University, the University of Washington, Graphika and Atlantic Council’s DFRLab released their findings in ‘The Long Fuse: Misinformation and the 2020 Election.’

In this post and in the attached reports we investigate a Twitter network attributed to actors in Armenia, Iran, and Russia.

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