The Fall and Rise of Techno-Globalism Democracies Should Not Let the Dream of the Open Internet Die

From Graham Webster and Justin Sherman, in Foreign Affairs
image of swirling graphic banner with conference attendee in foreground At an Internet security conference in Beijing, September 2018
Jason Lee, Reuters

Two key words were missing from the statements that followed the inaugural in-person summit in September of the Quadrilateral Security Dialogue, also known as the Quad, which features Australia, India, Japan, and the United States. The first absent word was predictable: “China.” Although the country’s growing strength is the clear geopolitical impetus for this Indo-Pacific grouping, officials are at pains to portray their efforts as positive and not about containing a rival. The other omitted word, however, was both less obvious and more important. 

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