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Moderated Content host Evelyn Douek discusses Twitter’s data security problems and what this says about privacy regulation more generally with Whitney Merrill, the Data Protection Officer and Privacy Counsel at Asana and long-time privacy lawyer including as an attorney at the FTC, and Riana Pfefferkorn, a Research Scholar at the Stanford Internet Observatory.

Large-scale voting fraud may be a chimera, but counting a rising number of ballots quickly will require investments in state and local election administration. Published in the Wall Street Journal.

SIO is now part of the new Coalition for Independent Technology Research to share independent, trustworthy research on digital technology and online harms.

In political conspiracy theories, as in television shows, the plot elements are always the same. (From The Atlantic)

Elon Musk’s Twitter deal reveals loopholes in U.S. national security oversight.

Daphne Keller of the Program on Platform Regulation writes about the European Union’s Digital Services Act (DSA), a major milestone in the history of platform regulation. Other governments are now asking themselves what the DSA’s passage means for them. The post briefly discusses that question, with a focus on platforms like Facebook or YouTube and their smaller would-be rivals. Published in Verfassungsblog.

Published in the International Association of Privacy Professionals

Marietje Schaake writes of Musk's first week and what we know about Twitter’s future. Published in the Financial Times.

Commentary

Renee DiResta of the Stanford Internet Observatory writes about the growing body of research suggesting human behavior on social media is strikingly similar to collective behavior in nature. Published in Noema Magazine.

Emma Llansó from the Center for Democracy & Technology and Daphne Keller from the Program on Platform Regulation are guests on the TechDirt podcast to talk about us the DSA and its many implications.

Twitter’s new owner faces a difficult regulatory landscape around the world. Published in The Atlantic.

Charles Mok is an internet entrepreneur and IT advocate. He was formerly a member of the Hong Kong Legislative Council and founded the Hong Kong chapter of the Internet Society. He is currently a Visiting Scholar at the Global Digital Policy Incubator at Stanford University. This article appeared in OPTF.

A political cartoon encouraging Indians to boycott Chinese products
Blogs
Blogs

An Analysis of a Pro-Indian Army Covert Influence Operation on Twitter

Pan’s research focuses on political and authoritarian politics, including how preferences and behaviors are shaped by political censorship, propaganda, and information manipulation.

Blogs

Stanford Internet Observatory collaborated with Graphika to analyze a large network of accounts removed from Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter in our latest report. This information operation likely originated in the United States and targeted a range of countries in the Middle East and Central Asia.

Twitter suspended a network of accounts that coordinated to promote narratives around the coronavirus pandemic, and to amplify a pro-Russian news site ahead of the invasion of Ukraine.

Following the success of The China Questions, a new volume of insights from top China specialists explains key issues shaping today’s United States–China relationship. Graham Webster of the DigiChina Project authored "What Is at Stake in the US–China Technological Relationship?" for the book.

The Program on Platform Regulation's Daphne Keller worked with the ACLU to file this comment to the Meta Oversight Board's "UK Drill Music" case.

In an essay for Lawfare Blog, Samantha Bradshaw, Renee DiResta and Christopher Giles look at how state war propaganda in Russia is increasingly prevalent on platforms that offer minimal-moderation virality as their value proposition.